Monthly Archives: July 2022

July Books

Non-fiction 8 (YTD 62)The Darwin Awards, by Wendy NorthcuttA Short History of Kosovo, by Noel MalcolmStability Operations in Kosovo 1999-2000: A Case Study, by Jason FritzThe Smell of War, by Roland BartetzkoPresidential Election, by John Danforth et alMake Your Brain … Continue reading

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Enola Holmes and the aristocratic appellation

Just a brief note on the film which we watched a week ago. Millie Bobby Brown, who we already knew as Eleven in Stranger Things, is great as Sherlock and Mycroft Holmes’ smarter younger sister Enola, as is Helena Bonham-Carter … Continue reading

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District 9

District 9 won the Ray Bradbury Award from SFWA (effectively the Nebula for Dramatic Presentation) the first year after it was repurposed, beating Avatar, Coraline, Moon, Star Trek and Up. As previously noted, it actually topped the nominations poll for … Continue reading

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Saturday reading

CurrentMidnight’s Children, by Salman RushdieLenin the Dictator, by Victor SebestyenThe Initiate, by Louise CooperSwordheart, by T. Kingfisher Last books finishedHeaven Sent, by Kara DennisonHell Bent, by Alyssa FrankeWinter’s Orbit, by Everina MaxwellSoulstar, by C.L. Polk (did not finish) Next booksThe … Continue reading

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June 2017 books

This is the latest post in a series I started in late 2019, anticipating the twentieth anniversary of my bookblogging which will fall in 2023. Every six-ish days, I’ve been revisiting a month from my recent past, noting work and … Continue reading

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The Kröller-Müller Museum; with Bosch, and a reunion

Anne and I took the opportunity of Belgium’s National Day last week to, er, get out of Belgium, and return to the Hoge Veluwe and the Kröller-Müller Museum, which we had previously visited 17 years ago in 2005. Again we … Continue reading

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Killdozer!, by Theodore Sturgeon

Second paragraph of third story (“Ghost of a Chance): It sort of got me. Maybe because she was so tiny and her hair was so white. Maybe because, white hair and all, she looked so young and helpless. But mostly, … Continue reading

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Lost, Not Stolen: The Conservative Case that Trump Lost and Biden Won the 2020 Presidential Election, by John Danforth et al

Second paragraph of third chapter: According to Michigan election officials who certified the results, President Biden carried Michigan by a margin of 154,188 votes out of 5.5 million cast.113 Biden received 50.6% of the vote and Trump received 47.8%.114 In … Continue reading

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The Unofficial Master Annual 2074, ed.  Mark Worgan

Second paragraph of third chapter: A student at the London School of Economics, Delgado did not complete his degree. He only lasted 18 months working in the business sector before pursuing his dream of being air actor at the age … Continue reading

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May 2017 books

This is the latest post in a series I started in late 2019, anticipating the twentieth anniversary of my bookblogging which will fall in 2023. Every six-ish days, I’ve been revisiting a month from my recent past, noting work and … Continue reading

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Moon (2009 film)

Moon won the 2010 Hugo for Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form, beating District 9 (which won the Bradbury/Nebula), Up, Star Trek and Avatar. It was actually only third in terms of nominations, and won the award by only 15 votes on … Continue reading

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Saturday reading

CurrentMidnight’s Children, by Salman RushdieLenin the Dictator, by Victor Sebestyen Last books finishedRedemptor, by Jordan IfuekoThe New Unusual, by Adrian Sherlock and Andy Frankham-AllenA Snake Falls to Earth, by Darcie Little Badger Next booksFugitive Telemetry, by Martha WellsThe Massacre of … Continue reading

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Half Life, Shelley Jackson; End of the World Blues, Jon Courtenay Grimwood; Nova Swing, M. John Harrison; The Orphan’s Tales: In the Night Garden, Catherynne M. Valente

These were the four novels that won the BSFA, Clarke and Tiptree Awards in 2007 for work of 2006. I should say also that the Tiptree jury gave a special citation to James Tiptree, Jr.: The Double Life of Alice … Continue reading

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The Lackprofil of Klingenberg

Here I am, at the age of nineteen, at the bottom of a ditch. I spent four months in the summer of 1986 working on an archæological site near Heilbronn in Germany, in the village of Klingenberg, as a volunteer … Continue reading

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Three books about Kosovo

I am working on a small project about Kosovo at the moment, and improving my reading around the subject. No detailed write-ups as those are for my project notes. Kosovo: A Short History, by Noel Malcolm. Second paragraph of third … Continue reading

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The Darwin Awards, by Wendy Northcutt

Second paragraph of third chapter: If humans are no longer evolving, the premise of the Darwin Awards is flawed. And even if the premise of the Darwin Awards is valid, do the particular stories in this book actually represent instances … Continue reading

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Guy Erma and the Son of Empire, by Sally Ann Melia

Second paragraph of third chapter: He paused to look up at St Joseph’s Cathedral, said to be the beating heart of the Dome. At the top of the entrance stairs, there was a massive door where a bishop and head … Continue reading

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April 2017 books

This is the latest post in a series I started in late 2019, anticipating the twentieth anniversary of my bookblogging which will fall in 2023. Every six-ish days, I’ve been revisiting a month from my recent past, noting work and … Continue reading

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The easternmost dead president

So I came across this interesting article yesterday, listing the gravesites of all of the presidents of the United States (apart from those who are still alive). It is illustrated by this lovely map: The westernmost tomb is that of … Continue reading

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A duel in 1723

I mentioned a few months back that I had discovered that one of my 5x great-grandfathers, John Ryan Glas (1692-1723), was killed in a duel by another of my 5x great-grandfathers, John White (married as a teenager in 1704, so … Continue reading

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Saturday reading

CurrentThe New Unusual, by Adrian Sherlock and Andy Frankham-AllenRedemptor, by Jordan IfuekoMidnight’s Children, by Salman Rushdie Last books finishedThe Smell of War, by Roland BartetzkoVictories Greater than Death, by Charlie Jane AndersThe Unofficial Master Annual, ed.  Mark WorganThe Orphan’s Tales: … Continue reading

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The Hurt Locker

The Hurt Locker won the Oscar for Best Picture of 2009 and five others, Best Director (Kathryn Bigelow, the first woman winner), Best Original Screenplay (Mark Boal), Best Film Editing, Best Sound Editing and Best Sound Mixing. The other nominees for … Continue reading

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Ninth Doctor and Thirteenth Doctor audios

The end of a week of Doctor Who audio-blogging – book-blogging will return shortly, but I also will try and keep more up to date with the other media I have been consuming here. Lost Warriors is the third volume … Continue reading

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Jenny and Susan: The Doctor’s daughter and the Doctor’s granddaughter

Two more Big Finish audios to report on in my week of BF write-ups: these concern the only canonical descendants of the Doctor in TV Who (though there is an adopted daughter as well in spinoff fiction). Carole Ann Ford … Continue reading

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Dodo rebooted (with @LCornelius_): new First Doctor audios

Back in February at Gallifrey One, Big Finish of course did their best to encourage us to take an interest in their latest output; I had a couple of encounters during the convention with Lauren Cornelius, who has been hired … Continue reading

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March 2017 books

This is the latest post in a series I started in late 2019, anticipating the twentieth anniversary of my bookblogging which will fall in 2023. Every six-ish days, I’ve been revisiting a month from my recent past, noting work and … Continue reading

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Blake’s 7: The Way Forward, and The Classic Adventures Series 01

Housekeeping point: I spent the last two weeks mainly commuting to work by car rather than by train, so my blogging has caught up with my reading backlog. This week I’m going to write up my recent audio listening instead … Continue reading

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The King of Almayne: a 13th century Englishman in Europe, by T.W.E. Roche

Second paragraph of third chapter: On the morning of 7th March, 1220, a royal messenger arrived at the gatehouse of Corfe Castle with the command of the Council to Peter de Mauley to convey the Lord Richard to Westminster for … Continue reading

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Saturday reading

CurrentThe Orphan’s Tales: In the Night Garden, by Catherynne M. ValenteVictories Greater than Death, by Charlie Jane AndersMake Your Brain Work, by Amy Brann Last books finishedGuy Erma and the Son of Empire, by Sally Ann Melia (did not finish)The … Continue reading

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Intimacy aka The Wall, by Jean-Paul Sartre

Second paragraph of “Erostratus”/”Erostrate”, third story in my edition (it has been published under two different titles, so I give both above): On a seventh floor balcony: that’s where I should have spent my whole life. You have to prop … Continue reading

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