Monthly Archives: September 2022

Matt Smith: The Biography, by Emily Herbert

Second paragraph of third chapter: But one man didn’t think like this. He believed that Doctor Who had a huge role to play in the twenty-first century, that the franchise was not dead but sleeping, and that, in short, it … Continue reading

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The WSFS Mark Protection Committee elections

As mentioned previously, I got elected earlier this month to the World Science Fiction Society’s Mark Protection Committee, which works to preserve the intellectual property of the terms WSFS, Hugo, Lodestar, etc. It’s a three year term, with three people … Continue reading

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Saturday reading

CurrentComplete Short Stories: the 1950s, by Brian AldissSpeaker for the Dead, by Orson Scott CardRichard of Cornwall: The English King of Germany, by Darren Bakerβ1 Last books finishedBlack Man aka Thirteen, by Richard MorganDoctor Who and the Dæmons, by Barry … Continue reading

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The Avengers

The Avengers won the 2013 Hugo for Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form. It had a pretty thumping victory at both stages. It beat The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, which I have seen, and The Cabin in the Woods, The Hunger … Continue reading

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March 2018 books

This is the latest post in a series I started in late 2019, anticipating the twentieth anniversary of my bookblogging which will fall in 2023. Every six-ish days, I’ve been revisiting a month from my recent past, noting work and … Continue reading

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Mr Britling Sees It Through, by H.G. Wells

Second paragraph of third chapter: “Have to do my fourteen miles before lunch,” he said. “You haven’t seen Manning about, have you?” I had no expectations whatsoever of this novel, originally published in 1916, one of the last of the … Continue reading

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A Matter of Life and Death, by George Mann, Emma Vieceli and Hi Fi

Second frame of third part: Continuing my journey through my substantial backlog of Doctor Who comics, I’m now at this Eighth Doctor collection from 2016. I have generally rated George Mann poorly as a writer, and so I am glad … Continue reading

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Political Animals, by Bev Laing

Third section (illustrated by a picture of a small boy standing under an elephant’s belly): No matter how much you feed a wolf, an elephant still has bigger BALLS.Russian popular saying. One of those New Internationalist books. A series of … Continue reading

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A royal burial (though not the one you’re thinking of) and how a monk helped me find my grandmother’s grave

So. My original plan when I booked today’s visit to London, two weeks ago, was to work from our London office today and tomorrow before getting the last Eurostar on Tuesday. But it turned out that for some reason the … Continue reading

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Family research and family reunion in Massachusetts

I had a very good morning of research in the Massachusetts Historical Society at the end of last month. My grandmother’s cousin Henry Seaver (a noted architect, probably named after my great-grandfather Henry Hibbard, and the father of writer Elizabeth … Continue reading

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Saturday reading

CurrentBlack Man, by Richard MorganComplete Short Stories: the 1950s, by Brian Aldiss Last books finishedJocasta, by Brian AldissFear of the Web, by Alyson LeedsDoctor Who – The Movie, by Gary RussellDoctor Who (1996), by Paul Driscoll Next booksSpeaker for the … Continue reading

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The Artist

The Artist won the Oscar for Best Picture of 2011 and four others, Best Director (Michel Hazanavicius), Best Actor (Jean Dujardin), Best Costume Design, and Best Original Score. There were eight other films in contention for Best Picture; I have seen … Continue reading

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February 2018 books

This is the latest post in a series I started in late 2019, anticipating the twentieth anniversary of my bookblogging which will fall in 2023. Every six-ish days, I’ve been revisiting a month from my recent past, noting work and … Continue reading

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The Traders’ War, by Charles Stross

Second paragraph of third chapter: Sometimes, when he was extremely tired, he’d lose his sense of smell. It was as if the part of his brain that dealt with scents and stinks and stuff gave up trying to make sense … Continue reading

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Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets, by Svetlana Alexievich, tr. Bela Shalyevich

Second paragraph of third chapter: Может быть, через пятьдесят или сто лет о той нашей жизни, которая называлась социализмом, будут писать объективно. Без слез и проклятий. Начнут раскапывать, как древнюю Трою. Недавно вообще хорошо сказать о социализме было нельзя. На Западе после … Continue reading

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The Light Fantastic, by Terry Pratchett

Second paragraph of third section: That statement is not really true. I think this was the first book I read by Terry Pratchett, and it was a delight to come back to it. The jokes are still funny, if no … Continue reading

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January 2018 booksnostalgia

This is the latest post in a series I started in late 2019, anticipating the twentieth anniversary of my bookblogging which will fall in 2023. Every six-ish days, I’ve been revisiting a month from my recent past, noting work and … Continue reading

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Chicon 8, the 2022 Hugos and the Business Meeting

Chicago was the first city in the USA that I ever set foot in, aged 5 in 1972, on a family visit to my father’s old friend Emmet Larkin. My only previous visit as an adult was in 2016 for … Continue reading

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Saturday reading

CurrentBlack Man, by Richard MorganJocasta, by Brian Aldiss Last books finishedA Matter of Life and Death, by George Mann, Emma Vieceli and Hi FiBrasyl, by Ian McDonaldMr Britling Sees It Through, by H.G. WellsMatt Smith: The Biography, by Emily Herbert … Continue reading

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George VI’s last appearance; and The King’s Speech

I had planned to publish this post today anyway, after watching the film two weeks ago, but Thursday’s news makes it all the more appropriate. I’m not especially a royalist – I decided not to renew my British passport in … Continue reading

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The Light Years, by Elizabeth Jane Howard

Second paragraph of third chapter (and these are long chapters): He was back again, standing in the bedroom doorway, waiting with exaggerated patience for her to shut her suitcase. He always insisted upon loading the car for her, which was … Continue reading

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The Kosovo Indictment, by Michael O’Reilly

Second paragraph of third chapter: Several children and a pregnant woman were among the 24 people killed in these two actions, most of them from just two families – Ahmeti and Sejdiu. Both families were associated with the KLA and … Continue reading

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That Damn’d Thing Called “Honour”: Duelling in Ireland, 1570-1860, by James Kelly

Second paragraph of third chapter, with table: Many factors contributed to the growth in enthusiasm for duelling in Ireland in the late 1760s and 1770s. The social and attitudinal effects of economic prosperity, already referred to,’ were at work a … Continue reading

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2022 Hugo statistics

The full statistics document for this year, mainly by me, is available here. Headlines 2235 final ballots and 1368 nominating ballots were received, consistent with 2020 and 2021, less than the 2014-2020 period, more than any year before 2014. No … Continue reading

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December 2017 books, and 2017 roundup

This is the latest post in a series I started in late 2019, anticipating the twentieth anniversary of my bookblogging which will fall in 2023. Every six-ish days, I’ve been revisiting a month from my recent past, noting work and … Continue reading

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Saturday reading

CurrentBrasyl, by Ian McDonaldMr Britling Sees It Through, by H.G. WellsA Matter of Life and Death, by George Mann, Emma Vieceli and Hi Fi Last books finishedThe Traders’ War, by Charles StrossPolitical Animals, by Bev Laing Next booksSpeaker for the … Continue reading

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The Harp and the Blade, by John Myers Myers

Second paragraph of third chapter: Walking thus loaded didn’t help my hunger or my disposition, but it warmed me up in short order. My burdens were not too heavy, but they were awkward; and a long sword wasn’t designed for … Continue reading

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Roger Zelazny’s Chaos and Amber, by John Betancourt

Second paragraph of third chapter: Aber suddenly laughed, then reached into the air, felt around for a second, and plucked a large white towel seemingly from nothingness. Second of the prequels to Zelazny’s great Amber series, and it is a … Continue reading

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The Time Warrior, by Matthew Kilburn (and Terrance Dicks)

When I first watched The Time Warrior in 2007, I wrote: The Time Warrior was the first story in the eleventh season of Doctor Who, over December 1973/January 1974. More significantly, it was the first outing for Elisabeth Sladen as … Continue reading

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